Learning Center

Information About Grasses & Weeds

Have a weed growing in your yard and need assistance identifying it? Browse our list of common weeds below. For more information, please contact us.

Grass

Bermuda

Bermuda grass is commonly found in Southern climates. The blades are short with a grey-green color and rough edges. Optimal growth occurs when exposed to full sun and warm climates with temperatures between 75 and 99 °F. In winter, the grass becomes dormant and turns brown.

Bermuda grass has a deep root system that allows it to survive drought situations. This makes it popular in warm, dry climates where most other grasses are unlikely to thrive.  It is also very fast-growing and tough, which, along with its ability to recover quickly from damage, makes it useful for sports fields.

Do you have Bermuda grass on your property? Learn how we can take care of it with our Bermuda & Zoysia grass program.

Centipede

Centipede Grass is a thick, coarse, grass of medium to light green color. It has short, upright stems that grow to be about 3-5 inches. Centipede grass is a low maintenance grass that requires infrequent mowing as well as low amounts of watering and fertilization. However, it does require full sun with a medium level of shade tolerance and will often suffer from high foot traffic. Its shallow root system makes it difficult to survive through periods of drought. When healthy, this grass is aggressive enough to prevent other weeds and types of grasses from growing.

Do you have Centipede grass on your property? Learn how we can take care of it with our Centipede & St. Augustine grass program.

Fescue

Fescue grass is a cool-season grass that thrives in sun and light shade.  These types of grasses are at their peek in the cold temperatures but decline in the heat of summer.  With its coarse texture and fast germination period, it is perfect for tolerating compacted soil and heavy foot traffic.  To keep the grass healthy through the hot summer months, frequent water is required or the blades will quickly turn brown.  With this type of grass, it is important to overseen annually to replace affected or damaged grass that occurred from the heat.

Do you have Fescue grass on your property? Learn how we can take care of it with our Fescue Grass Program.

St. Augustine

St. Augustine is a dark green grass with flat, broad blades. It has I high soil tolerance and can thrive in soil with pH levels between 5.0 and 8.5. Its peak season is through spring and summer that is popular in most tropical and subtropical regions. St. Augustine grass is considered to be medium to high level maintenance that forms a thick, carpet-like turf that easily crowds out most weeds and other grasses from growing. This type of grass is commonly used in pastures, ranches and despite being slightly less drought resistant, also rivals bermuda grass in many lawns.

Do you have St. Augustine grass on your property? Learn how we can take care of it with our Centipede & St. Augustine grass program.

Zoysia

Zoysia grass is a form of creeping grass with a strong resistance to disease and is commonly found in coastal areas or grasslands. This type of grass can tolerate a wide range of temperatures, sunlight levels, and water levels. Because of this, it is widely used for lawns in temperate climates and on golf courses to create fairways. Zoysia grass is excellent at stopping erosion on slopes in addition to preventing weeds from growing. Zoysia grass thrive during warm-wet summers and go dormant in the cooler, drier environments throughout the winter months.

Zoysia Grass is popular because of its soft texture and low growth habits. When compared to St. Augustine grass, it requires much less fertilization and is less susceptible to attacks from insects and disease.

Do you have Zoysia grass on your property? Learn how we can take care of it with our Bermuda & Zoysia grass program.

Weeds

Annual Bluegrass

Annual bluegrass is one of the most widely distributed winter annual weedy grasses. Its seeds germinate from August through April. This invasive weed typically goes dormant in the hot, dry weather. The seeds remain and germinate again in cool, moist weather.

Annual bluegrass is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, specific herbicides must be applied.

Broadleaf plantain

Broadleaf plantain is a low-growing, perennial broadleaf weed. It is the second most common weed in American yards, coming in just behind the dandelion.  Germination begins when soil temperatures reach 50 degrees, and continues through the growing season. A healthy plan can produce 14,000 seeds per year! Seeds can retain viability in the soil more than 60 years.

Broadleaf plantain is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, specific herbicides must be applied.

Chickweed

Common chickweed is a succulent, low growing winter annual. Its seed germinate from November to early March, and the plant matures from April through June.

Chickweed is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, chickweed must be spot treated on each service.

Clover

White clover is a creeping perennial that can reseed itself. It grows best in cool, moist weather in spring or in irrigated lawns. The plant matures from fall into winter.

White clover is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, white clover must be treated with appropriate herbicides.

Crabgrass

Large crabgrass is a summer annual weed which reporduced primarily from seed from late February through the summer. Large crabgrass normally bunches and forms a tight mat and can have purple stems.

Crabgrass is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, crabgrass must be spot treated with appropriate herbicides.

Dallisgrass

Dallisgrass is a perennial grass which reproduces only from seed. This grass has a coarse, wide blade that when mowed can elongate faster than other grass causing more frequent mowing. Its seed germinate throughout the year. The weed matures from September to November.

Dallisgrass is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, dallisgrass must be spot treated on each service with appropriate herbicides.

Dandelion

Dandelion is a widely distributed perennial. Its seed can germinate any time of the year, and it can regrow from its strong taproot.

Dandelion is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, dandelion must be spot treated on each service.

Goosegrass

Goosegrass is a summer annual grassy weed. The mature plant grows to a height of 15 inches to 3 feet. It is somewhat spreading and grows as a clump of upright flattened stems. Lower potions of the stem appear silver to white.. It spreads by seeds that germinate later in the season than other annual grasses.

Goosegrass is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, goosegrass must be spot treated on each service.

Ground Ivy

Ground ivy is a perennial with creeping stems that sprawl over the soil surface forming a thick mat and crowding out other plants. Ground ivy has a typical mint-like appearance with square stems and 2 leaves at each node. It emits a somewhat unpleasant minty odor when crushed. Although the plant produces seeds, the principle method of reproduction is vegetative by way of creeping stems.

Ground ivy is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, specific herbicides must be applied.

Henbit

Henbit is an upright winter annual that blooms in the spring. This is usually the first weed to bloom and can easily be identified on the highways.

Henbit is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, active henbit must be spot treated on each service. Mowing 4-5 days after treatment helps to remove.

Lespedeza

Lespedeza is a woody difficult-to-control summer annual broadleaf weed often confused for a small clover. It grows close to the ground and is seldom cut by a mower. Lespedeza chokes out thin turf during hot dry spells. Its seed germinates mid to late summer.

Lespedeza is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, lespedeza must be spot treated on each service.

Nutsedge

Yellow Nutsedge, commonly called nutgrass, is a troublesome perennial weed. The abundantly produced tubers and sprouts produce a bulb from which develops new shoots and underground stems (rhizomes).

Nutgrass is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. The complex life cycle of this plant makes it difficult to control. After germination, multiple applications are needed to gain control. Visible results are yellowing and dying of leaf blade. New shoots will emerge from the fibrous root system and bulbs.

Splurge

Prostrate spurge is an annual broadleaf weed. It produces seeds abundantly; making it difficult to eradicate once it is established. The seed germinate from March to April, and the plants mature during the hot, dry weather.

Prostrate spurge is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, multiple applications are needed for control.

Virginia Buttonweed

Virginia Buttonweed is a perennial broadleaf weed that starts to grow during early summer and continues through frost. This weed can spread 
by producing new roots and shoots from broken stems or fleshy roots, or by seed produced above or below the soil surface.

Virginia Buttonweed is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, depending on grass types, multiple applications of herbicides may be needed to control.

Wild Garlic

Wild garlic is a cool season perennial. It grows in small grass-like clumps from late fall through early spring. Wild garlic reproduces by seed, aerial bulblets, and underground bulbs.

Wild garlic is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, wild garlic must be spot treated on each service.

Wild Violet

Wild violet is a low-growing perennial broadleaf weed with a dense, fibrous root system and heart-shaped leaves that often cup toward the petiole to form a funnel shape. Wild violet is considered difficult-to-control due to its aggressive growth, waxy leaves and resistance to most common herbicides.

Wild violet is best prevented by late winter/early spring pre-emergent applications. After germination, wild violet must be spot treated on each service; however, best control is obtained in cooler weather when they are in bloom.